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U.K. Teen Diagnosed with Coca-Cola Addiction

U.K. Teen Diagnosed with Coca-Cola Addiction


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After two hospitalizations, the teen is seeking help for her soda addiction

One teen's Coca-Cola habit sent her to the hospital.

We’ve all heard it before: “I’m addicted,” or, “I couldn’t live without this.’” But in the case of 18-year-old Zoe Cross, she really is addicted — to Coca-Cola. The U.K. teen was admitted to the hospital recently for her habit of drinking gallons of the sugary soft drink each day.

“I admit I’m addicted to Coke,” said Cross in an interview with The Sun. “Not the drug, the drink.”

The habit started when she was 14 and quickly spiraled out of control after she started a job at a local Subway restaurant, where employees have free range for drinking soft drinks offered by the company. While at work. she collapsed on two separate occasions, the most recent incident landing her in the hospital for five days. It’s thought that the most recent incident occurred due to a reported E. Coli infection from drinking it straight from an unwashed can.

At the height of her Coke binges, the 5’ 4’’ teen admitted to drinking 24 cans per day — nearly 3,360 calories per day. Doctors told the teen that her body couldn’t continue to handle the high sugar intake, and she could eventually die if she continued to drink so much Coke.

For now, Cross is on the road to recovery. She hopes to kick the habit, but says it’s not easy.

“Coming off Coke has been hard because I get terrible headaches when I don’t drink it,” Cross said to The Sun. “But I’m hoping I’ll pull through.”

We all have our favorite food, but are there any foods that you could see yourself “addicted” to?

Sean Flynn is a Junior Writer for The Daily Meal. Follow him on Twitter @BuffaloFlynn


The Great Depression Of The Class Of 2020

Those last few months as a high school senior are normally filled with treasured rites of passage like prom, ditch day, and graduation. But for the Class of 2020, there was to be no pomp and circumstance—literally or figuratively.

The onset of the novel coronavirus pandemic in March necessitated swift and sudden school closures across the country, with the majority of students being dismissed for a Spring Break without end. Overnight, everything changed: They found themselves housebound, stripped of their freedoms, stranded from their social circles, and thrust into the unknown territory of virtual learning.

One by one, much-anticipated milestones were unceremoniously postponed. Then canceled. In some cases, replaced with remote alternatives that, while well-intentioned, hardly served as adequate substitutes.

And while grappling with all of these unwelcome changes, millions of college-bound kids have also been confronted with an even more unpredictable future: A freshman year that’s destined to look and feel unlike any other. Carefree parties, giddy orientations, and horizon-broadening classroom discussions will be supplanted by gradual phase-ins, social distancing, and experimental hybrid curriculums.

If it sounds like a recipe for turmoil and trouble, well, it is. So, what happens when this already vulnerable group gets hit with a relentless gauntlet of loss, disappointment, and uncertainty? It could set the stage for an unprecedented surge in depression and anxiety.

“The sense of isolation, the change in routines, the panic and confusion over what the future holds: It’s like the perfect storm,” says Josh Godinez, a school counselor at Centennial High School in Corona, CA, and president elect of the California Association of School Counselors.

According to Nefertiti Nowell, PhD, a clinical therapist and founder of Nowell and Associates in Naperville, Illinois, we should brace for major fallout in the months and even years to come. “We’re dealing with the Covid epidemic now, and my fear is that we’ll be dealing with a mental health epidemic next,” Nowell says. “As of March 16, these young people’s lives and dreams were basically stopped. We’re going to have a lot of depression, anxiety and impulsivity ahead.”

Do you feel depressed?

Take our 2-minute Depression quiz to see if you may benefit from further diagnosis and treatment.


The Great Depression Of The Class Of 2020

Those last few months as a high school senior are normally filled with treasured rites of passage like prom, ditch day, and graduation. But for the Class of 2020, there was to be no pomp and circumstance—literally or figuratively.

The onset of the novel coronavirus pandemic in March necessitated swift and sudden school closures across the country, with the majority of students being dismissed for a Spring Break without end. Overnight, everything changed: They found themselves housebound, stripped of their freedoms, stranded from their social circles, and thrust into the unknown territory of virtual learning.

One by one, much-anticipated milestones were unceremoniously postponed. Then canceled. In some cases, replaced with remote alternatives that, while well-intentioned, hardly served as adequate substitutes.

And while grappling with all of these unwelcome changes, millions of college-bound kids have also been confronted with an even more unpredictable future: A freshman year that’s destined to look and feel unlike any other. Carefree parties, giddy orientations, and horizon-broadening classroom discussions will be supplanted by gradual phase-ins, social distancing, and experimental hybrid curriculums.

If it sounds like a recipe for turmoil and trouble, well, it is. So, what happens when this already vulnerable group gets hit with a relentless gauntlet of loss, disappointment, and uncertainty? It could set the stage for an unprecedented surge in depression and anxiety.

“The sense of isolation, the change in routines, the panic and confusion over what the future holds: It’s like the perfect storm,” says Josh Godinez, a school counselor at Centennial High School in Corona, CA, and president elect of the California Association of School Counselors.

According to Nefertiti Nowell, PhD, a clinical therapist and founder of Nowell and Associates in Naperville, Illinois, we should brace for major fallout in the months and even years to come. “We’re dealing with the Covid epidemic now, and my fear is that we’ll be dealing with a mental health epidemic next,” Nowell says. “As of March 16, these young people’s lives and dreams were basically stopped. We’re going to have a lot of depression, anxiety and impulsivity ahead.”

Do you feel depressed?

Take our 2-minute Depression quiz to see if you may benefit from further diagnosis and treatment.


The Great Depression Of The Class Of 2020

Those last few months as a high school senior are normally filled with treasured rites of passage like prom, ditch day, and graduation. But for the Class of 2020, there was to be no pomp and circumstance—literally or figuratively.

The onset of the novel coronavirus pandemic in March necessitated swift and sudden school closures across the country, with the majority of students being dismissed for a Spring Break without end. Overnight, everything changed: They found themselves housebound, stripped of their freedoms, stranded from their social circles, and thrust into the unknown territory of virtual learning.

One by one, much-anticipated milestones were unceremoniously postponed. Then canceled. In some cases, replaced with remote alternatives that, while well-intentioned, hardly served as adequate substitutes.

And while grappling with all of these unwelcome changes, millions of college-bound kids have also been confronted with an even more unpredictable future: A freshman year that’s destined to look and feel unlike any other. Carefree parties, giddy orientations, and horizon-broadening classroom discussions will be supplanted by gradual phase-ins, social distancing, and experimental hybrid curriculums.

If it sounds like a recipe for turmoil and trouble, well, it is. So, what happens when this already vulnerable group gets hit with a relentless gauntlet of loss, disappointment, and uncertainty? It could set the stage for an unprecedented surge in depression and anxiety.

“The sense of isolation, the change in routines, the panic and confusion over what the future holds: It’s like the perfect storm,” says Josh Godinez, a school counselor at Centennial High School in Corona, CA, and president elect of the California Association of School Counselors.

According to Nefertiti Nowell, PhD, a clinical therapist and founder of Nowell and Associates in Naperville, Illinois, we should brace for major fallout in the months and even years to come. “We’re dealing with the Covid epidemic now, and my fear is that we’ll be dealing with a mental health epidemic next,” Nowell says. “As of March 16, these young people’s lives and dreams were basically stopped. We’re going to have a lot of depression, anxiety and impulsivity ahead.”

Do you feel depressed?

Take our 2-minute Depression quiz to see if you may benefit from further diagnosis and treatment.


The Great Depression Of The Class Of 2020

Those last few months as a high school senior are normally filled with treasured rites of passage like prom, ditch day, and graduation. But for the Class of 2020, there was to be no pomp and circumstance—literally or figuratively.

The onset of the novel coronavirus pandemic in March necessitated swift and sudden school closures across the country, with the majority of students being dismissed for a Spring Break without end. Overnight, everything changed: They found themselves housebound, stripped of their freedoms, stranded from their social circles, and thrust into the unknown territory of virtual learning.

One by one, much-anticipated milestones were unceremoniously postponed. Then canceled. In some cases, replaced with remote alternatives that, while well-intentioned, hardly served as adequate substitutes.

And while grappling with all of these unwelcome changes, millions of college-bound kids have also been confronted with an even more unpredictable future: A freshman year that’s destined to look and feel unlike any other. Carefree parties, giddy orientations, and horizon-broadening classroom discussions will be supplanted by gradual phase-ins, social distancing, and experimental hybrid curriculums.

If it sounds like a recipe for turmoil and trouble, well, it is. So, what happens when this already vulnerable group gets hit with a relentless gauntlet of loss, disappointment, and uncertainty? It could set the stage for an unprecedented surge in depression and anxiety.

“The sense of isolation, the change in routines, the panic and confusion over what the future holds: It’s like the perfect storm,” says Josh Godinez, a school counselor at Centennial High School in Corona, CA, and president elect of the California Association of School Counselors.

According to Nefertiti Nowell, PhD, a clinical therapist and founder of Nowell and Associates in Naperville, Illinois, we should brace for major fallout in the months and even years to come. “We’re dealing with the Covid epidemic now, and my fear is that we’ll be dealing with a mental health epidemic next,” Nowell says. “As of March 16, these young people’s lives and dreams were basically stopped. We’re going to have a lot of depression, anxiety and impulsivity ahead.”

Do you feel depressed?

Take our 2-minute Depression quiz to see if you may benefit from further diagnosis and treatment.


The Great Depression Of The Class Of 2020

Those last few months as a high school senior are normally filled with treasured rites of passage like prom, ditch day, and graduation. But for the Class of 2020, there was to be no pomp and circumstance—literally or figuratively.

The onset of the novel coronavirus pandemic in March necessitated swift and sudden school closures across the country, with the majority of students being dismissed for a Spring Break without end. Overnight, everything changed: They found themselves housebound, stripped of their freedoms, stranded from their social circles, and thrust into the unknown territory of virtual learning.

One by one, much-anticipated milestones were unceremoniously postponed. Then canceled. In some cases, replaced with remote alternatives that, while well-intentioned, hardly served as adequate substitutes.

And while grappling with all of these unwelcome changes, millions of college-bound kids have also been confronted with an even more unpredictable future: A freshman year that’s destined to look and feel unlike any other. Carefree parties, giddy orientations, and horizon-broadening classroom discussions will be supplanted by gradual phase-ins, social distancing, and experimental hybrid curriculums.

If it sounds like a recipe for turmoil and trouble, well, it is. So, what happens when this already vulnerable group gets hit with a relentless gauntlet of loss, disappointment, and uncertainty? It could set the stage for an unprecedented surge in depression and anxiety.

“The sense of isolation, the change in routines, the panic and confusion over what the future holds: It’s like the perfect storm,” says Josh Godinez, a school counselor at Centennial High School in Corona, CA, and president elect of the California Association of School Counselors.

According to Nefertiti Nowell, PhD, a clinical therapist and founder of Nowell and Associates in Naperville, Illinois, we should brace for major fallout in the months and even years to come. “We’re dealing with the Covid epidemic now, and my fear is that we’ll be dealing with a mental health epidemic next,” Nowell says. “As of March 16, these young people’s lives and dreams were basically stopped. We’re going to have a lot of depression, anxiety and impulsivity ahead.”

Do you feel depressed?

Take our 2-minute Depression quiz to see if you may benefit from further diagnosis and treatment.


The Great Depression Of The Class Of 2020

Those last few months as a high school senior are normally filled with treasured rites of passage like prom, ditch day, and graduation. But for the Class of 2020, there was to be no pomp and circumstance—literally or figuratively.

The onset of the novel coronavirus pandemic in March necessitated swift and sudden school closures across the country, with the majority of students being dismissed for a Spring Break without end. Overnight, everything changed: They found themselves housebound, stripped of their freedoms, stranded from their social circles, and thrust into the unknown territory of virtual learning.

One by one, much-anticipated milestones were unceremoniously postponed. Then canceled. In some cases, replaced with remote alternatives that, while well-intentioned, hardly served as adequate substitutes.

And while grappling with all of these unwelcome changes, millions of college-bound kids have also been confronted with an even more unpredictable future: A freshman year that’s destined to look and feel unlike any other. Carefree parties, giddy orientations, and horizon-broadening classroom discussions will be supplanted by gradual phase-ins, social distancing, and experimental hybrid curriculums.

If it sounds like a recipe for turmoil and trouble, well, it is. So, what happens when this already vulnerable group gets hit with a relentless gauntlet of loss, disappointment, and uncertainty? It could set the stage for an unprecedented surge in depression and anxiety.

“The sense of isolation, the change in routines, the panic and confusion over what the future holds: It’s like the perfect storm,” says Josh Godinez, a school counselor at Centennial High School in Corona, CA, and president elect of the California Association of School Counselors.

According to Nefertiti Nowell, PhD, a clinical therapist and founder of Nowell and Associates in Naperville, Illinois, we should brace for major fallout in the months and even years to come. “We’re dealing with the Covid epidemic now, and my fear is that we’ll be dealing with a mental health epidemic next,” Nowell says. “As of March 16, these young people’s lives and dreams were basically stopped. We’re going to have a lot of depression, anxiety and impulsivity ahead.”

Do you feel depressed?

Take our 2-minute Depression quiz to see if you may benefit from further diagnosis and treatment.


The Great Depression Of The Class Of 2020

Those last few months as a high school senior are normally filled with treasured rites of passage like prom, ditch day, and graduation. But for the Class of 2020, there was to be no pomp and circumstance—literally or figuratively.

The onset of the novel coronavirus pandemic in March necessitated swift and sudden school closures across the country, with the majority of students being dismissed for a Spring Break without end. Overnight, everything changed: They found themselves housebound, stripped of their freedoms, stranded from their social circles, and thrust into the unknown territory of virtual learning.

One by one, much-anticipated milestones were unceremoniously postponed. Then canceled. In some cases, replaced with remote alternatives that, while well-intentioned, hardly served as adequate substitutes.

And while grappling with all of these unwelcome changes, millions of college-bound kids have also been confronted with an even more unpredictable future: A freshman year that’s destined to look and feel unlike any other. Carefree parties, giddy orientations, and horizon-broadening classroom discussions will be supplanted by gradual phase-ins, social distancing, and experimental hybrid curriculums.

If it sounds like a recipe for turmoil and trouble, well, it is. So, what happens when this already vulnerable group gets hit with a relentless gauntlet of loss, disappointment, and uncertainty? It could set the stage for an unprecedented surge in depression and anxiety.

“The sense of isolation, the change in routines, the panic and confusion over what the future holds: It’s like the perfect storm,” says Josh Godinez, a school counselor at Centennial High School in Corona, CA, and president elect of the California Association of School Counselors.

According to Nefertiti Nowell, PhD, a clinical therapist and founder of Nowell and Associates in Naperville, Illinois, we should brace for major fallout in the months and even years to come. “We’re dealing with the Covid epidemic now, and my fear is that we’ll be dealing with a mental health epidemic next,” Nowell says. “As of March 16, these young people’s lives and dreams were basically stopped. We’re going to have a lot of depression, anxiety and impulsivity ahead.”

Do you feel depressed?

Take our 2-minute Depression quiz to see if you may benefit from further diagnosis and treatment.


The Great Depression Of The Class Of 2020

Those last few months as a high school senior are normally filled with treasured rites of passage like prom, ditch day, and graduation. But for the Class of 2020, there was to be no pomp and circumstance—literally or figuratively.

The onset of the novel coronavirus pandemic in March necessitated swift and sudden school closures across the country, with the majority of students being dismissed for a Spring Break without end. Overnight, everything changed: They found themselves housebound, stripped of their freedoms, stranded from their social circles, and thrust into the unknown territory of virtual learning.

One by one, much-anticipated milestones were unceremoniously postponed. Then canceled. In some cases, replaced with remote alternatives that, while well-intentioned, hardly served as adequate substitutes.

And while grappling with all of these unwelcome changes, millions of college-bound kids have also been confronted with an even more unpredictable future: A freshman year that’s destined to look and feel unlike any other. Carefree parties, giddy orientations, and horizon-broadening classroom discussions will be supplanted by gradual phase-ins, social distancing, and experimental hybrid curriculums.

If it sounds like a recipe for turmoil and trouble, well, it is. So, what happens when this already vulnerable group gets hit with a relentless gauntlet of loss, disappointment, and uncertainty? It could set the stage for an unprecedented surge in depression and anxiety.

“The sense of isolation, the change in routines, the panic and confusion over what the future holds: It’s like the perfect storm,” says Josh Godinez, a school counselor at Centennial High School in Corona, CA, and president elect of the California Association of School Counselors.

According to Nefertiti Nowell, PhD, a clinical therapist and founder of Nowell and Associates in Naperville, Illinois, we should brace for major fallout in the months and even years to come. “We’re dealing with the Covid epidemic now, and my fear is that we’ll be dealing with a mental health epidemic next,” Nowell says. “As of March 16, these young people’s lives and dreams were basically stopped. We’re going to have a lot of depression, anxiety and impulsivity ahead.”

Do you feel depressed?

Take our 2-minute Depression quiz to see if you may benefit from further diagnosis and treatment.


The Great Depression Of The Class Of 2020

Those last few months as a high school senior are normally filled with treasured rites of passage like prom, ditch day, and graduation. But for the Class of 2020, there was to be no pomp and circumstance—literally or figuratively.

The onset of the novel coronavirus pandemic in March necessitated swift and sudden school closures across the country, with the majority of students being dismissed for a Spring Break without end. Overnight, everything changed: They found themselves housebound, stripped of their freedoms, stranded from their social circles, and thrust into the unknown territory of virtual learning.

One by one, much-anticipated milestones were unceremoniously postponed. Then canceled. In some cases, replaced with remote alternatives that, while well-intentioned, hardly served as adequate substitutes.

And while grappling with all of these unwelcome changes, millions of college-bound kids have also been confronted with an even more unpredictable future: A freshman year that’s destined to look and feel unlike any other. Carefree parties, giddy orientations, and horizon-broadening classroom discussions will be supplanted by gradual phase-ins, social distancing, and experimental hybrid curriculums.

If it sounds like a recipe for turmoil and trouble, well, it is. So, what happens when this already vulnerable group gets hit with a relentless gauntlet of loss, disappointment, and uncertainty? It could set the stage for an unprecedented surge in depression and anxiety.

“The sense of isolation, the change in routines, the panic and confusion over what the future holds: It’s like the perfect storm,” says Josh Godinez, a school counselor at Centennial High School in Corona, CA, and president elect of the California Association of School Counselors.

According to Nefertiti Nowell, PhD, a clinical therapist and founder of Nowell and Associates in Naperville, Illinois, we should brace for major fallout in the months and even years to come. “We’re dealing with the Covid epidemic now, and my fear is that we’ll be dealing with a mental health epidemic next,” Nowell says. “As of March 16, these young people’s lives and dreams were basically stopped. We’re going to have a lot of depression, anxiety and impulsivity ahead.”

Do you feel depressed?

Take our 2-minute Depression quiz to see if you may benefit from further diagnosis and treatment.


The Great Depression Of The Class Of 2020

Those last few months as a high school senior are normally filled with treasured rites of passage like prom, ditch day, and graduation. But for the Class of 2020, there was to be no pomp and circumstance—literally or figuratively.

The onset of the novel coronavirus pandemic in March necessitated swift and sudden school closures across the country, with the majority of students being dismissed for a Spring Break without end. Overnight, everything changed: They found themselves housebound, stripped of their freedoms, stranded from their social circles, and thrust into the unknown territory of virtual learning.

One by one, much-anticipated milestones were unceremoniously postponed. Then canceled. In some cases, replaced with remote alternatives that, while well-intentioned, hardly served as adequate substitutes.

And while grappling with all of these unwelcome changes, millions of college-bound kids have also been confronted with an even more unpredictable future: A freshman year that’s destined to look and feel unlike any other. Carefree parties, giddy orientations, and horizon-broadening classroom discussions will be supplanted by gradual phase-ins, social distancing, and experimental hybrid curriculums.

If it sounds like a recipe for turmoil and trouble, well, it is. So, what happens when this already vulnerable group gets hit with a relentless gauntlet of loss, disappointment, and uncertainty? It could set the stage for an unprecedented surge in depression and anxiety.

“The sense of isolation, the change in routines, the panic and confusion over what the future holds: It’s like the perfect storm,” says Josh Godinez, a school counselor at Centennial High School in Corona, CA, and president elect of the California Association of School Counselors.

According to Nefertiti Nowell, PhD, a clinical therapist and founder of Nowell and Associates in Naperville, Illinois, we should brace for major fallout in the months and even years to come. “We’re dealing with the Covid epidemic now, and my fear is that we’ll be dealing with a mental health epidemic next,” Nowell says. “As of March 16, these young people’s lives and dreams were basically stopped. We’re going to have a lot of depression, anxiety and impulsivity ahead.”

Do you feel depressed?

Take our 2-minute Depression quiz to see if you may benefit from further diagnosis and treatment.


Watch the video: How to Make Hookah out of Coca Cola Bottle (May 2022).